Victims Tombstones

This page will show various tombstones of victims of the Dakota Uprising. About 400 victims lie in unmarked and unknown graves, the most in any Indian war in the nation.  Here are some of those whose who did have gravestones erected in their memory.  We are also posting the stories of the survivors. Some of these tombstones were found on the website findagrave.com and are the work of Curtis Dahlin and Bill Cox. We thank them for sharing these with us. An alphabetical list of Victims’ Tombstones can be accessed here by clicking on this PDF document: Alphabetical List of Victims' Tombstones.pdf

Anna Stina Broberg Peterson

This tombstone is located in the St. Hilaire Cemetery, Pennington County, MN in the southwestern part of the cemetery.  It is the resting place of Anna Peterson, the lone survivor of the Broberg family from the West Lake settlement in Kandiyohi County, MN.  See her full story in the Descendant Story tab on this website. Inscription: Anna Stina Broberg Peterson, only survivor of the Anders Broberg family, massacred by the Sioux Indians at West Lake, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota on August 20, 1862. Erected by the grandchildren. For her obituary and biography, see the findagrave memorial submitted by Bill Cox at:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSvcid=182561&GRid=57988858&

Johan and Catherine Kochendorfer

Inscription:  "Kochendorfer, Johan 38 Yrs, Catherine 36 Yrs, Sarah 3 Yrs. Victims of Redwood Falls Massacre, Aug. 1862." Johan and Catherine Kochendorfer tombstone is located in Oakland Cemetery, St. Paul, MN.

For more information on this family, see Curtis Dahlin’s findagrave memorial at: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgipage=gr&GSmcid=47099816&GRid=34633762&

To read two Kochendorfer family stories, go to the Descendant Stories page. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Andreas and Lena Lundborg-filtered

Andreas and Lena Lundborg

This is a photo of Andreas and Lena Lundborg's grave marker located in the West Union Lutheran Cemetery in Cologne, Carver County, MN.  For more details of the life of Andreas and his role in the Dakota Uprising, see the Monument section. His photograph is also found in the Family Photograph section. See the  findagrave memorial submitted by Bill Cox, who also submitted this photo, at: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSvcid=182561&GRid=58272756&

Peter B. Broberg               

This grave marker is located in the Lebanon Cemetery, New London, Kandiyohi County, MN.  His grave is on the left side of the cemetery walkway, about half the distance to the Lundborg-Broberg state monument. Peter was the lone survivor of the Daniel P. Broberg family.  For more information on their story, see the Monuments section. His findagrave memorial by Bill Cox, who also submitted the photo: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSvcid=182561&GRid=58975944&



Minnie Buce Carrigan  

Minnie was the daughter of Gottfried and Wilhelmina Buce (Busse) and the wife of Owen Carrigan.  On August 18, 1862, she was the taken hostage by the Indians along with her surviving siblings, August and Amelia at the Middle Creek settlement in Flora Township.  Her parents and two sisters, Bertha and Caroline, were killed. Ten weeks later, they were freed at Camp Release. A photo of Minnie can be found on the Family Photographs tab, and a link to her findagrave memorial is on that page.  Minnie’s tombstone is located in Evergreen Cemetery, Renville County, MN, under a tree in the southeast corner. Her findagrave memorial by Bill Cox, who also submitted the photo:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSvcid=182561&GRid=59271555&.                                                                                                                The link to her book, “Captured by the Indians: Reminiscences                                                                                        of Pioneer Life in Minnesota” is found in the Books section.  

Helen Paddock Carrothers Tarbel McNanney           

McHanney stone

Helen was one of the hostages taken by the Indians from her home in the Beaver Creek settlement in Renville County. To see her picture, go to the Family Photographs tab. She is buried in the Riverside Cemetery, Dodge Center, MN in the NE section, Block 1, Row 6, Lot 206. Her biography from findagrave by Bill Cox, who also submitted this photo, is found here: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=57988111



Samuel Lundborg tombstone


Johannes and Krestina Lundborg

Johannes, the son of Andreas and Lena Lundborg, is the husband of Krestina Larsdotter. They are buried in the West Union Cemetery, Cologne, Carver County, MN. See his photograph on the Family Photograph tab which also shows a link to his biography. For further information on the Lundborg family, see the  findagrave memorial  submitted by Bill Cox, who also submitted this photo, at: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSvcid=182561&GRid=58282605&

Samuel and Anna Lundborg           

Samuel Lundborg tombstone2Anna Lundborg Tombstone

Samuel was the son of Andreas and Lena Lundborg, settlers in the West Lake community (now called Monson Lake) in Kandiyohi County.  His biography and picture can be found on the Family Photographs page.  Samuel and Anna are buried in the West Union Lutheran Cemetery in Cologne, MN. Their findagrave memorial by Bill Cox, who also submitted these photos http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSvcid=182561&GRid=58283095&

Joseph, Jonathan and Oratia Brown  

Inscription: "In memory of Joseph L. Brown, Jonathan Brown, Oratia Brown, Massacred by the the Indians in 1862, Erected by the town of Burnstown." Joseph Brown, who was 73 years of age in 1862, lived in Burnstown Township, Brown County, Minnesota with his children Jonathan and Oratia. They lived far from any other settlers, on the road between New Ulm and Lake Shetek. They operated a stopping off place for travelers on the road. Sometime between August 18-20, the Browns fled their home, heading for New Ulm. The three of them were killed by the Dakota at a point about five miles from their home.  Joseph, Jonathan and Oratia are memorialized in the Springfield Cemetery, Springfield, Brown County. For the findagrave memorial done by Curtis Dahlin, who also submitted photo: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSmcid=47099816&GRid=34186257&




Martin Bluem  Family 

Inscription: "Killed by Indians, Father and Mother, my Sisters & Brothers, Martin Blim, Died Aug. 10, 1862, Lizie Blim, Died Aug. 10, 1862, Margarett & Liz Blim, Died Aug. 10, 1862, Adam & Charlie Blim, Died Aug. 10, 1862.” (The family name is misspelled, as it should be Bluem, and the date is incorrect. It should be either August 18 or 19.)

 Six members of the Bleum family were killed by the Dakota that week; only 12 year old John survived. The family is buried in Oak Ridge Cemetery, Stark, Brown County, MN. To see the full biography on this family, see Curtis Dahlin’s findagrave memorial at:http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=34186723. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Heinrich Bosche  

Inscription:  "Heinrich Bosche. Born 18 April 1819, Murdered by Indians the 18 May, 1863." Heinrich Bosche was killed by the Dakota Indians on May 18, 1863, while he was plowing on the Pfaender farm in Milford Township, Brown County, near New Ulm. The main part of the uprising occurred in 1862, but small Dakota raiding parties continued to kill settlers in 1863, 1864, and 1865. Bosche was killed by a small Dakota party. There are also other family members listed on the gravestone. Heinrich is buried in the New Ulm Catholic Cemetery, New Ulm, Brown County, MN. For his findagrave memorial by Curtis Dahlin, who also submitted photo: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgipage=gr&GSmcid=47099816&GRid=34187544&




John Buhrer   

Inscription: "John Buhrer, Died Aug. 20, 1862, Aged 34 Yrs., 4 Mos., and 14 days." In 1862, John Buhrer (or Buchro or Buehro) was living with his family in Cairo Township in Renville County, Minnesota.  On August 18, Buhrer and his neighbor, Felix Smith, discounted the reports of the Dakota killing whites, but they did send their families to nearby Fort Ridgely, and the men came there for the night. Mrs. Buhrer wanted her husband John to return to their home and retrieve a green silk dress she had left there. Both John and Felix went on this mission on August 20. As it turned out, the Dakota attacked Fort Ridgely that day, and killed the two men as they tried to get back into the fort. There are four enties on Buhrer's gravestone, with Buhrer's being in the upper right corner. John is buried in the New Ulm City Cemetery, New Ulm, Brown County, MN. For his findagrave memorial by Curtis Dahlin, who also submitted photo: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=buhrer&GSfn=john&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSst=25&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=34214503&df=all&

Jacob Castor 

Inscription:  (Written in German) "Here Rests Jak. Castor, born the 6 October, 1831, murdered by the Indians on 23 August 1862, Rest in Peace." Jacob Castor was a 30-year-old baker who in 1862 lived in New Ulm, Minnesota with his wife Elizabeth and their children. In response to the uprising attacks, the white settlers around New Ulm flocked into the town, and prepared to defend themselves. The Dakota attacked New Ulm on August 19 and 23, with the latter battle being a closely fought affair. During the battle on the 23rd, Jacob was able to ply his trade, working at his bakery. Towards evening, he took a basket of bread which he planned to distribute to the defenders of the town. Rain began to fall, so Jacob wrapped a blanket over his shoulders. The Dakota also used blankets in the same manner. Jacob was mistook for a Dakota Indian and was shot and killed by a defender. He is buried in the New Ulm City Cemetery, New Ulm, Brown County, MN. For his findagrave memorial done by Curtis Dahlin, who also submitted photo, see:  

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=castor&GSfn=jacob&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=34185714&df=all&

Martha Riggs Morris 

Martha was born in Chippewa County, MN and died on the Sisseton Indian Reservation where she had previously served as a missionary to the Indians.  She is buried in the Oakwood Cemetery in Beloit, Rock County, WI next to her parents.  To see her photograph and biography link, go to the Family Photographs section of this website. For her findagrave memorial by Bill Cox, who also submitted photo: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSvcid=182561&GRid=55841569&

Anders Petter and Johanna Oman

Oman tombstone Johanna Oman

Anders was  born in Sweden and died in Dakota County in 1936. He and his family survived the Dakota attack and shortly thereafter moved to Afton, MN and then to San Francisco Township, in Carver County, MN. Anders and Johanna are buried in the East Union Lutheran Church Cemetery, East Union, Carver County, MN.  For more on this family, go to the Family Photograph page where his picture and biography link are posted. For their findagrave memorial by Bill Cox, who also submitted these photos:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSvcid=182561&GRid=58302182&

Dr. John and Sarah Wakefield

Inscription: “Wakefield, John L. 1823-1874; Sarah F. 1830-1899,” Dr. John Wakefield was the physician at the Yellow Medicine Agency at the time of the Dakota War. He was born in Connecticut in 1823 and died in Shakopee, MN in 1874. His wife, Sarah, was born in Rhode Island and died in St. Paul, MN. She went on to write a book about her captivity with the Indians during the uprising.  Both are buried in the Valley Cemetery in Shakopee. To see Sarah’s photograph and read their obituaries, go to the Family Photographs section of this website. For their findagrave memorials done by Bill Cox, who also submitted photo:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSsr=41&GSvcid=182561&GRid=58147870&  

Michael and Justine Boelter   

Michael was a brother to John who was killed in the attack on the Middle Creek Settlement  in Renville County on August 18, 1862. His wife, Justine, their children and his parents were also killed along with many others from the Flora Township area. Michael and his sister-in-law (Justina) and her three children somehow survived the attack. The harrowing story of their escape is vividly told by Bill Cox, who also provided the photos, on his findagrave memorial at this link: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=58091447Michael eventually married John’s widow, Justina, and they moved to Kenyon, MN where they had 7 additional children.  They are buried in the Kenyon Cemetery in Goodhue County. Plot: The grave is located in the middle of the cemetery where two roads intersect. There is an old hand pump in the cemetery. Walk about 100 feet south and then about 40 feet west to find the plot.

Daniel A.  Cross          

Daniel and his family were settlers northwest of Hutchinson, MN when the outbreak occurred, and they sought shelter in the Hutchinson stockade. When Cross returned to his farm on September 23, he was killed. He is buried in the Oakland Cemetery at Hutchinson in McLeod County, MN. For more detail about the events surrounding his death, see Curtis Dahlin’s Memorial on findagrave at: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSmcid=47099816&GRid=34632717&Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.


Phillip H. Deck          

Inscription: "Phillip H. Deck, Born in France 1826, killed at Manannah by Indians. Aug. 26, 1862. Aged 36 yrs. 3 ms. & 2 ds. Rest in Peace.” Phillip Deck was one of four men killed by the Dakota Indians in Manannah Township in northwestern Meeker County, MN, on August 26, 1862. A small party of men from the area had fled their homes when they heard of the Uprising. On August 26, they decided to return to their homes to retrieve some of their possessions. They were attacked by a small Dakota party, and the four men were killed. He is buried in the Manannah Cemetery, Meeker County, MN.  For more details, see Curtis Dahlin’s findagrave memorial at: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSmcid=47099816&GRid=34128525& Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Clement and Marguerita Pereau Cardinal 

Clement Cardinal2Marguerite Cardinal

Inscriptions: Father 1835-1907; Mother 1841-1893 Margeritte Pereau, spouse of Clement Cardinal died on 15 July 1893 at the age of 52 (Written in French). Clement and Marguerita were living in the Birch Cooley area at the time of the uprising. Marguerita's father, Peter Pereau  and her brother-in- law, Eusibi Picard, were killed. Her mother, brothers and sisters escaped, and they made their way to Fort Ridgeley. Marguerita was captured by the Indians, along with her young child, Clement Jr. and her niece, Elizabeth Picard. Clement had been wounded by the Indians, but dragged himself to a hiding place until they were gone. He escaped to Fort Ridgeley and was one of the men there who was given arms to protect the fort. Two days after Marguerita’s release, she testified at the court trial that aided in the conviction of the Indian Te-he-hdo-ne-cha.  Here is the on-line transcript of that trial:  http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/dakota/Trialrec1.html. Later that fall, the family moved to Centerville, MN. They are buried in the St. Genevieve's Catholic Cemetery in Centerville. To read more about the Cardinal family, go to the  Descendant Stories section on this website. Photos submitted by Jenna Taverna.

Diedrich and Margaret Wichmann        

Diedrich and Margaret Wichmann were settlers living in the Beaver Creek neighborhood in Renville County at the time of the uprising.  He was working at the Lower Sioux Agency and was responsible for warning his neighbors that the Dakota were killing people down at the agency. Diedrich, his wife, and children survived by escaping to Fort Ridgely. The riveting story of the Wichmann’s escape was written by his son, Diedrich, and was published in The History of Renville County, Volume 2, Compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, p. 916-920. It is available to read on-line at the KinSource website: http://www.kinsource.com/MinnesotaHistoryBooks/RenvilleHistory1916V2/RenvilleHistory1916Chapter37/WichmansNarrative.htmDiedrich (1822-1891) and Margaret (1824-1892) are both buried in the Beaver Falls Cemetery in Renville County. Photos submitted by Bill Cox.

Anna Endreson Alvig

Anna Endresen Alvig

Anna Endreson was married to Peder Alvig, and they had 15 children. Anna was Guri Endreson's youngest daughter. Guri is known for her heroic deeds during the Sioux uprising of 1862. On August 21, 1862, the fourth day of the uprising, Indians approached the Endreson cabin and killed Anna's father (Lars) and her brother (Endre), and wounded her other brother (Ole) who died later of pneumonia. Her two older sisters (Guri and Britha) were captured by the Indians, but escaped. Anna at age 3 and her mother survived the attack by hiding in their root cellar. She is buried in the Vikor Lutheran Church Cemetery, Willmar, MN.  Photo submitted by Bill Cox.

Joseph Dickinson


Joseph C. and Lathrop H. Dickinson       

Inscription:  J. C. --- L. H. and E. S. Dickinson, Children of A. & Maria Dickinson, and Clara, Grand Daughter." Brothers Joseph and Lathrop Dickinson were working at the Lower Sioux Agency at the time of the outbreak on August 18.  Lathrop was killed and Joseph and his family escaped to Fort Ridgely. After surviving the two battles at the fort,  Joseph joined the Joseph R. Brown burial party, probably to find the remains of Lathrop. On September 2, the party was camped at Birch Coulee and Joseph was among those killed in the battle. He shares a gravestone with his brother. They are buried at the Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery in Minneapolis, MN. For more details on the Dickinsons, see Curtis Dahlin’s memorial on findagrave at this link: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSmcid=47099816&GRid=34130849&Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

John and Justina Boelter          

Inscription: "IN MEMORY OF THE BRAVE SETTLERS WHO FELL AT THIS POINT IN THE MASSACRE OF 1862.” John and Justina and her family were among those who were memorialized through the erection of this marker located in Flora Township, Renville County, MN. The monument is on County Road 21, section 35 of Flora Township, Renville County, in the Middle Creek settlement where several were killed by the Indians during the Sioux uprising of 1862. The Boelter claims were situated a short distance to the south and west of this monument. John was killed while he was checking their cattle and his wife and two of his children survived. It is assumed that the soldiers buried John Boelter on his claim, located  near the spot where he fell on the S.E. quarter of Section 34, Flora township.  Bill Cox, who submitted this photo, has written an extensive biography on this findagrave link: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgipage=gr&GSln=boelter&GSfn=john&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=92098980&df=all&

 Mary Emily Schwandt Schmidt

Mary Schwandt SchnudtMaggie BrassWilliam Schmidt

Mary, another heroic survivor of the Dakota War, is mentioned several times on the website. See the Monuments Section for the Schwandt Monument and the Family Photographs section for a picture featuring her and two other female survivors. 





This findagrave site maintained by Cindy Coffin shows more  photos:http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgipage=gr&GSln=schmidt&GSfn=mary&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSst=25&GScnty=1371&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=32739155&df=all&The story of her friendship with with the Indian woman, Maggie Snana Brass, who saved her life, is found on another Coffin memorial: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=15187239Mary was born in Germany on March 23.  1848 and died July 26, 1939 in LeSueur County, MN. Mary’s husband was William F. Schmidt, 1837-1914. Both are buried in  the Oakland Cemetery, St. Paul, MN in Block 13, Lot 35. Her riveting story can be read on-line at: http://www.archive.org/stream/storyofmaryschwa00schwrich/storyofmaryschwa00schwrich_djvu.txt. Photos submitted by Bill Cox.

James W. Lynd       

Inscription:  Here lie the remains of Hon. J.W. Lynde killed by Sioux Indians Aug. 18, 1862.  The tombstone is located at the Lower Agency. James Lynd was the first victim of the Sioux Uprising at the Lower Sioux Agency.  On August 18, he was shot while standing in the back door of Myrick’s trading post, where he was working.  Lynd was a fur trader, an editor of the Henderson Democrat and served in the Minnesota State Senate.   For more details of his life, see Curtis Dahlin’s book, The Dakota Uprising, A Pictorial History, page 51 .Photo submitted by Bill Cox. 




Joseph Renshaw and Susan Frenier Brown

Joseph Brown

Joseph Brown was a native of Maryland but spent his entire adult life living amongst the Dakota Indians. During his lifetime, he was an Army drummer boy, a fur trader, a political leader in Minnesota and the leader of the burying party sent out by Sibley on August 31, 1862. (It is thought that this group of soldiers were the ones who buried our great-great grandfather, Charles Clasen and his son Frederick.) While camped at Birch Coulee, his troops were ambushed by the Dakota. Their camp was under siege for about 30 hours with a large number of casualties. His wife, Susan, was a mixed-blood Dakota. A very detailed story of her life is on her findagrave memorial created by Cindy Coffin at:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=48934342. Joseph is buried in the Brown Cemetery, Henderson, Sibley County, MN.  After his death, Susan moved to the Sisseton Agency in South Dakota.  She is buried in the Saint Mary’s Episcopal Cemetery (Agency Village) in Roberts County, South Dakota. Photo submitted by Bill Cox. 

Dr. Philander Humphrey       

humphrey philander dr. family marker

Dr. Humphrey was the government physician at the Lower Sioux Agency and lived there with his wife, Susan, and their three children, John, Jay and Gertrude. Upon hearing of the outbreak, the family attempted to flee to Fort Ridgely. On the way, they stopped for a rest at a deserted cabin. Son John was sent to a spring to bring back water and heard a shot coming from the cabin. He fled and came upon the Captain Marsh party and joined their group. They returned to the cabin, found it burned and his father dead outside the cabin. John was the lone survivor of his family. His findagrave memorial created by Dean Milton Pettis is found here: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=66433333.  Photo submitted by Bill Cox. The memorial shows a plaque erected to the Humphrey family which is located at the Woodlawn Cemetery, St. Peter, MN where John is buried. Philander, Susan, Jay and Gertrude are buried in the family plot at the Green Lawn Cemetery, Traverse, Nicollet County, MN.

Dr. Thomas and Margaret Williamson  

Inscriptions: “Died June 23, 1879 Aged 79 yrs. 3 ms. for 15 years missionary to the Dakota” and “In Memory of Margaret Pouge, wife of Dr. T.S. Williamson, First missionary to the Dakotas, Who departed this life July 21st, 1872 In the 68th year of her age.  She hath done what she could.”  Thomas was a missionary/physician to the Dakota and served missions at Lac Qui Parle, Kaposia,  and Yellow Medicine near the Upper Agency. Their story and the kindnesses they had shown to the Dakota is told in Curtis Dahlin’s book, The Dakota Uprising – A Pictorial History, pages 27 and 32-33. Thomas and Margaret and other members are their family are buried in the Green Lawn (Old Traverse) Cemetery, Traverse, Nicollet County, MN.  Photos submitted by Bill Cox.

Jonathan and Amanda Earle  

earle amanda marker

The Earle family and their six children settled in Beaver Falls Township, located five miles northwest of the Lower Agency. When they received word of the outbreak, they, along with other settlers, attempted to escape to Fort Ridgely, 18 miles southeast. Amanda and her two daughters were captured. Son Radnor (see the Radnor Earle Monument on the Monuments tab) was killed heroically attempting to save his father by using a gun loaded with pebbles. The rest of the family scattered but brother Ezmon joined the Joseph R. Brown burial party and found and buried Radnor’s remains on September 1, 1862.  Amanda and her daughters were released at Camp Release six week later. The tombstones of Jonathan and Amanda are located in the LeMars Memorial Cemetery in LeMars, IA. Son Radmor is probably buried where he fell at the NW qtr. of the SE qrt. of Sec. 12, Beaver Township, Renville Co., MN. His tombstone, however, was moved to LeMars.  For more detail on this family, see Curtis Dahlin’s book, Dakota Uprising Victims Gravestones and Stories, pgs. 39-40. Photos submitted by Bill Cox and Curtis Dahlin.

Radnor Clifton Earle   

Inscription on his tombstone in LeMars, IA: "In Memoriam. Radnor Clifton, Son of Jonathan W. Earle, Amanda M. Earle, Born Feb. 17, 1847, Massacred Aug. 18, 1862 By the Sioux, while defending his father. Noble boy, too good for earth, In Heaven rest evermore.” There is a monument erected by the Renville County Pioneers memorializing young Radnor, and it can be seen in the Monument Section of this website. 


For the complete story of his heroism, see Curtis Dahlin’s findagrave memorial at: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=earle&GSfn=radnor&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=34141568&df=all&. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Stephen Return and Mary Longley Riggs           

Mary Longely RiggsSteven Riggs

Stephen and Mary were long-time missionaries among the Dakota, in fact at the time of the outbreak, they had ministered to them for 25 years. Their mission was at Hazelwood when word arrived of the killings at the Lower Agency. The story of their escape and a photo of the the escapees is found on the Those Who Escaped During the Sioux Uprising tab. After reaching safety, Stephen was appointed as chaplain to Colonel Sibley’s forces at Fort Ridgely, Birch Coulee, Wood Lake and finally Camp Release. He also served as an interpreter during the Dakota Indian trials and was present at the hanging of the 38 Dakota in Mankato on December 26. He continued to advocate for the Dakota the remainder of his life. Both died in Beloit, WI and are buried at the Oakwood Cemetery in Beloit. Photos submitted by Bill Cox.

Andrew Myrick       

Inscription: Andrew J. Myrick, Born June 28, 1832, Killed by Sioux Indians in the Massacre at Red Wood Agency, Mn, Aug. 18, 1862.” Andrew Myrick’s statement to the starving Indians (“So far as I am concerned, if they are hungry, let them eat grass.”) was an inciting factor in the Dakota War which began shortly after his retort. Myrick was the 30-year-old trader at the Lower Agency who refused to give the Dakota credit for food in early August.  On the morning of August 18, he realized the Dakota were killing whites and attempted to escape when he was shot near his store. His body was discovered by his brother on September 1 with his mouth stuffed with grass and a scythe driven through his body. His body was brought to St. Paul for a funeral on March 7.  Myrick is buried in the Oakland Cemetery, St. Paul, MN. His great-grandson has created a findagrave memorial at this url:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=13377888. Photo submitted by Bill Cox.

William and Almira Hatch Everett Family, Willie, Charlie and Lillian   

everett william marker

The Everett family settled in the remote area of  Lake Shetek area in Murray County with some 45 other settlers. On August 20, after a party of Indians came upon them, they and other neighbors escaped to a large slough which became known as Slaughter Slough. The refuge was filled with tall reeds and the Indians were able to locate their movements and eventually killed or wounded many of the party. William was badly wounded and made his way out of the slough with the help of his brother-in-law, Charlie Hatch. Almira and sons Charlie, 2 years old and Willie, 5 years old, were killed. Daughter Lillian was taken captive. Their story is told in more detail in Curtis Dahlin’s book, “The Dakota Uprising – A Pictorial History,” pgs. 140-41. Of the 50 settlers who lived at Lake Shetek, about 15 were killed, 11-12 taken captive, and 21 managed to escape. The Lake Shetek marker lists the Everett family casualties.  See the Monuments Tab for more details. Father William and daughter Lillian Curtiss are buried in the Woodville Cemetery in Waseca, MN. Photos courtesy of Bill Cox, Lake Shetek Monument, Curtis Dahlin.

John and Lavina Day Eastlick, Merton, Frank, Giles, Frederick and John

everett lillian keeney curtiss markereastlick john markereastlick merton marker

The Eastlicks also lived in the Lake Shetek settlement and took refuge in Slaughter Slough after being pursued by the Dakota.  John, age 39, was killed as were sons Frederick, age 5, and Giles, age 8.  Frank was shot twice  but survived. Lavina was also shot in the head, side, and heel and left for dead. She, Merton, and Johnny escaped but became separated. Eleven year-old Merton carried his 15-month-old brother, Johnny about 50 miles, and they were eventually reunited with their mother. Merton became a hero in Minnesota’s eyes and his photograph was requested by Governor Ramsey. John, Frederick and Giles are memorialized on the Lake Shetek Monument in Murray County. For a detailed story about the Eastlicks, see Cindy Coffin’s findagrave memorial on the young hero, Merton, at:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=32810024.  Lavina died in Canada in 1923 and her biography is posted by Bill Cox on her findagrave memorial: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=61103083. John Jr.  is buried in Hillside Cemetery in Monticello, MN, and Merton is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Rochester, MN. Photo submitted by Bill Cox.

Amos Williamson Huggins

Inscription:  "Amos W. Son of Alex & Lydia Huggins Who was killed by the Indians at Lac qui Parle August 19, 1862 Aged 29 Yrs & 6 Mo. For He that has entered into his rest, he also hath ceased from his own works as God did from His. Heb 4 & 10.” Amos was the eldest son of Alexander and Lydia Huggins and brother to Rufus who was one of the defenders in the New Ulm conflict. (See his tombstone on the Those Who Served Tombstone section.) He grew up among the Dakota as his parents worked with the Riggs and Williamson Mission at Lac Qui Parle. On August 19, his familiarity and friendship with the Indians were not enough to save his life. He was shot in the back outside of his home after his wife and children had fled and were eventually captured. He was buried where he fell but later reburied in the Green Lawn Cemetery in Traverse, MN next to his brother, Rufus.  There is also a memorial  on the south side of County Road 20, just east of the Lac qui Parle River bridge which reads "Amos Huggins, Missionary and Teacher to the Indians, Only Victim of Sioux Uprising in Lac Qui Parle." To learn more about his wife Sophia and her children’s captivity, see Curtis Dahlin’s book, “The Dakota Uprising – A Pictorial History”, pages 67-68. Photo submitted by Bill Cox. 


Philander Prescott           

Philander Prescott lived amongst the Dakota for over 42 years and had married a Dakota woman. On August 18, upon learning that the Indians were killing whites, he attempted an escape to Fort Ridgely. After traveling 10 miles, he encountered Dakota on the trail and pled for his life, but they killed him anyway. His wife and daughter were taken hostage but escaped during the Battle of Wood Lake on September 23 and eventually reached Fort Ridgely. Prescott was buried by soldiers on September 23 and later reburied in the Layman’s or Pioneer and Soldiers’ Memorial Cemetery in Minneapolis, MN. Photo submitted by Bill Cox. 

Adolph Schilling

Adolph Schilling

Inscription: In German, "Adolph Schilling, Born the 18 November, 1802, died by the Indians the 18 August, 1862.” Adolph Schilling was a 59-year-old German living in Milford Township, northwest of New Ulm, Minnesota. Adolph and his 21-year-old daughter Louise were killed on August 18, while his wife Christine and son Joseph escaped. Adolph and Louise were among the 52 whites killed in Milford Township that day. He is buried in the New Ulm City Cemetery, New Ulm, MN. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.




Amos Dustin Family

Amos Dustin

Inscription: "Burial Place, Dustin Family, Massacred by the Indians, June 30, 1863." The date on the stone is incorrect, as it should read June 29 for three of the victims. Amos and his family and three children had left their Wright County home in Moores Prairie during the 1862 incident but returned the next year. The family consisted of Amos, wife Kate, and children Alma, Robert, and Leon and Amos’s mother, Jeanette. They were attacked by a small party of Dakota near Howard Lake. Amos, Robert and Jeanette were killed and died that day, and Kate was mortally wounded. She, however, managed to escape with Alma and Leon  and were found eventually by a search party. Kate died on July 3. The family is buried  in the Mission Center Cemetery in Waverly, MN. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Anders Olson

Anders Olsen

Inscription:  "Anders Olson Bakkedok, Fodt (born) 30 Juli 1828, Killed by Sioux Indians, 22 Sept, 1862." Anders was born in Norway and settled in Meeker County before the uprising.  Anders Olson, who also used the surname Bakkedok, was killed by the Dakota on September 22, 1862. His body was found and buried the next day. Anders’ story is related on page 14 of "Dakota Uprising Victims: Gravestones & Stories," published by Curtis Dahlin in 2007.  He is buried in the Ness Memorial Cemetery in Meeker County, MN. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.




Andrew Jewett Family

In 1865, the Jewett family consisting of Andrew, his wife Harriet, their son William, and Andrew's parents Mark and Susan, were living in Rapidan Township in Blue Earth County, Minnesota. Even though the main part of the war ended in 1862, small Dakota raiding parties continued to plague the settlements in Minnesota into 1865. Early in the morning of May 2, 1865, a party of Dakota attacked the Jewetts at their home, killing Andrew, Harriet, and Susan, and mortally wounding Mark. Two-year-old William was wounded in the head with a tomahawk, but he survived. The Dakota also killed a Jewett relative, Charles Tyler, who was cutting wood nearby. For more details on the capture and ultimate hanging of their killers, see Curtis Dahlin’s findagrave memorial at: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSsr=1&GSmcid=47099816&GRid=34650993&The Jewetts are buried in the Garden City Cemetery in Blue Earth County, MN near the grave of Charles Tyler. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Rev. August Nierens

Inscription:  "Aug. Nierens, Minister of the Gospel of the Ev. Ass. of N. A. of the Iowa Conf., Killed by the Indians Sept 2, 1862 at his home near Nickolet, Nickolet Co. Minn, in the Fourth Year of His Ministry, Aged 34 Years." In 1862, August Nierens and his family lived in Nicollet County, Minnesota.  August and his family escaped to Fort Ridgely, where they remained when the Dakota attacked the fort on August 20 and 22. The siege of the fort was lifted on August 27. On September 1, August and his family felt that it was safe to return to their home. Unfortunately, the next morning, a small Dakota raiding party shot and killed August and several neighbors, Christian and William Richter. The rest of August's family was unharmed.  He is buried in the Trinity Cemetery in Nicollet, MN. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.




Anton and Maria Messmer

Inscription: In German, "In Memory of the Parents of Theresia Henle, Anton Messmer and wife Maria Anna born Schuster.” Anton and Maria Messmer, who were about 60 or 61 years of age, were both killed on August 18, 1862, Anton while he was in the field harvesting grain, and Maria in the yard at their home. Theresa Henle, a daughter of the Messmers, lived nearby, and saw the Dakota killing Maria. The Messmer’s son, 26-year-old Joseph, was mortally wounded by the Dakota. The Messmers share a gravestone with their grandchildren, Martin, Anton, and Maria Henle, who were also killed by the Dakota. They are buried in the New Ulm Catholic Cemetery, New Ulm, MN. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Benedict T. Drexler

Benedict Drexler

Thirty-five year old Benedict Drexler lived with his family in Milford Township, Brown County, Minnesota. On August 18, 1862, the Dakota launched an attack on the whites, killing hundreds. Benedict was working in his field that day when the Dakota came and killed him. Benedict shares a gravestone with other uprising victims, including members of the Hartman, Fink, Zeller, and Zettel families. His gravestone inscription reads "Benedick T. Drexler."  He is buried in the New Ulm City Cemetery, New Ulm, MN. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.




Charles Tyler

Inscription: "Charles Tyler, May 2, 1865, Aged 17 Yrs." Early in the morning of May 2, 1865, 17-year-old Charles Tyler was cutting wood near the home of his relative, Andew Jewett. The Jewetts lived in Rapidan Township, Blue Earth County, Minnesota. That morning, a small party of Dakota Indians attacked the Jewetts, killing four. They also killed Charles,  He and the Jewetts are buried close to one another in the Garden City Cemetery in Blue Earth County, MN. For more details on the capture and punishment of the guilty Dakota, see Curtis Dahlin’s findagrave memorial at: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSsr=41&GSmcid=47099816&GRid=34651908&   Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Christian and William Richter

Christian Richter

Inscription: "Richter, Father Christian, Son William, Killed Sept 2, 1862 During the New Ulm Uprising, Marker Placed Sept. 2, 1987, 125th Anniversary." In 1862, Christian and Christiana Richter and their seven children were living near the Minnesota River in Nicollet County, Minnesota. On September 2, 1862, a small band of Dakota attacked the Richters, killing Christian and William and wounding Henry. They are buried in the Trinity Cemetery, Nicollet, MN next to  their neighbor, Rev. August Nierens, who was also killed that day.  Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Rev. Christian Louis Seder

Inscription:  "A Crown of Life, In Loving Memory of C. Louis Seder, minister of the Gospel of the Evangelical Association of the Iowa Conference, Killed by the Indians, Aug. 18, 1862 at Beaver River, Renville County, Minn., in the 7 Year of his Ministry, Aged 33 Years." On Sunday, August 17, 1862, Rev. Christian Louis Seder was in Renville County, preaching to several gatherings of settlers who belonged to the German Evangelical Church. He stayed in the area overnight, planning to return home south of New Ulm the following day. While beginning to make his way home on August 18, three Dakota encountered Seder and killed him. Up to 74 of those he ministered to in Renville County were also killed that day by the Dakota. He is buried in the Cottonwood Cemetery, Brown County, MN. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.



Florian Hartman

Inscription:  "Joh. Florian Hartman." Florian Hartman and his wife, Maria, lived on a farm in Milford Township, Brown County, MN. On August 18, he was working at harvesting his grain when the Dakota arrived. They mortally wounded Florian and killed his helper, John Rohner. Maria, who was at home, heard the shooting and came to the field where she found Florian badly wounded and Rohner dead. Florian urged Maria to flee as the Dakota might still be in the area. She did, but came back later in the day, and Florian was dead. Maria was fearful, and went into hiding. It was not until about September 4 that a search party found her. He shares a gravestone with several other victims, including members of the Drexler, Fink, Zettell, and Zeller families, all victims of the Dakota. Florian is buried in the New Ulm City Cemetery. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Franz, Mary, Julia and Franz Massopust

Inscription:  In German, "Franz (Massopust), Age 60 Years, Franz (Grandson of Franz), Age 6 Years, Mary A., Age 28 Years, Julia, Age 18 Years, Killed by the Indians on 18 August, 1862.” Franz Massopust, a widower, was living in Milford Township, Brown County, MN with his children. On August 18, the Dakota came to the Massopust home, killing Franz, his daughters Mary and Julia, and his grandson Franz. They also wounded his son, John, who managed to escape. Fifty-two settlers were killed in Milford Township that day. After the uprising had been put down, many Dakota were tried by a Military Commission. Two Dakota -- Aicage, or To Grow Upon, and Mahoowayma -- were convicted of killing the Massopusts. They were among the 38 Dakota hanged at Mankato, Minnesota on December 26, 1862. The Massopusts are buried in the New Ulm City Cemetery.  Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.


James McKannon


James A. McGannon

James A. McGannon, who was 28 years of age, was killed by the Dakota Indians on July 1, 1863, while traveling alone near the Meeker and Wright County lines. Chief Little Crow and a small party of Dakota were in the area at the time, and when Little Crow was killed two days later north of Hutchinson, Minnesota, he was wearing McGannon's coat. McGannon's story is related on page 77 of "Dakota Uprising Victims: Gravestones & Stories," published by Curtis Dahlin in 2007. James is buried in the Fairhaven Cemetery, Stearns County, MN.  Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

John Martin, Monika, and Max Fink and Grandson Carl Maerkle

Inscription: "Joh. Martin and Monika Fink, their son Max Fink, and of grandson Carl Maerkle." In 1862, John Martin Fink and his wife Monika and family were living in Milford Township, Brown County, MN. On August 18, Milford Township was hit hard that day, with 52 settlers killed. John, Monika, their 23-year-old son Max, and 2-year-old grandson Carl Maerkle were killed at the Fink home that day. The details of their demise is unknown, as there were no survivors to tell the tale. They share a gravestone with other victims, including the Hartman, Drexler, Zettel and Zeller families. The Fink family is buried in the New Ulm City Cemetery.  Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.



John S. Jones


John S. Jones

Inscription: "At Rest, John S. Jones, Died Sept. 10, 1862, Aged 43 Years." John Jones and his wife and their six children were living in Cambria Township, Blue Earth County, MN in 1862.  On September 10, Jones was on his way to help his neighbor, Robert Jones, stack grain. A small party of Dakota intercepted him, and in spite of him putting up a fight, as the tines on his pitchfork were bent and bloody, they killed him. That day, the Dakota also killed several other farmers in the area. The surviving settlers buried the victims that they could locate the same day. He is buried in the Jerusalem Cemetery, Lake Crystal, MN.  Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

John Baptiste, Barbara, Elizabeth, Stephen, Anton, and Johanna Zettel

Inscription: "Joh. Bapt. and Barbara Zettel, born Fink, and their children Elizabeth, Stephen, Anton and Johanna Zettel." In 1862, John and Barbara Zettel and their four young children were living in Milford Township, Brown County, MN. There were 52 settlers killed in Milford Township that day, and the Zettels were among the hardest hit families, with all six being killed. Those killed were John and Barbara who were 36 years of age; Elizabeth who was 8; Stephen who was 5; Anton who was 4; and Johanna who was 2. They all died that day, except Barbara who lived for several weeks, probably dying in Mankato or St. Peter. The family is buried in the New Ulm City Cemetery.  Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.




Linus Howe

Inscription:  "Linus Howe, Born in Worchester, Mass, 1803. Killed at Manannah, Minn., by Indians. Aug. 26, 1862, Aged 59 Years. A Last Tribute by a Sorrowing Son."  Fifty-nine year old Linus Howe was killed by the Dakota Indians in Manannah Township in northwestern Meeker County on August 26, 1862. Howe, along with his neighbors, had fled when they heard of the Uprising, but decided to return to their homes on August 26  and retrieve some of their belongings. They were attacked by a small Dakota party, and the four men were killed. Howe shares a gravestone with Phillip Deck and Joseph Page, two of the victims, while the gravestone for the fourth victim, Wilmot Maybee, is nearby.They are all buried in the Manannah Cemetery in Meeker County, MN.  Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Joseph Page

Inscription:  "Sacred to the Memory of Jos. Page, Killed at Manannah Minn., the Indians, Aug. 26, 1862, Aged 50 Years.” Joseph Page was one of four men who were killed by the Dakota Indians in Manannah Township in northwestern Meeker County on August 26, 1862. Page and his neighbors had fled their homes upon hearing of the Uprising, but, on August 26, a group of settlers returned to retrieve some of their possessions. They were attacked by a small party of Dakota, and four men were killed. Page shares a gravestone with Phillip Deck and Linus Howe, and the fourth victim, Wilmot Maybee, is buried nearby in the Manannah Cemetery in Meeker County, MN. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.




Max Zeller Family

Inscription:  "Max and Lucretia Zeller, born Fink, and their children Joh., Monica, Cezilia, Barbara and Conrad Zeller.” Max, age 39, and his wife, Lucretia, age 37, and their family were living in Milford Township, Brown County, MN in 1862. Milford Township was hit hard on August 18, with 52 settlers being killed that day. There are no accounts on exactly what took place that day at the Zeller home, but it resulted in the deaths of most members of the family. John, who was 16 years old, was not killed by the Dakota, but he died in 1867 in Ohio. The Zeller family is  buried in the New Ulm City Cemetery.  Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Martin and Theresa Henle Family

Martin HenleMartin Henle_1

Inscription: In German, "Children of Anton and Theresa Henle, Martin, Anton and Maria, murdered by Indians, 1862, Maria and Max survive." On August 18, 1862, the Dakota Indians attacked the settlers living in Milford Township, Brown County, MN and killed 52 whites. Among the victims were three children of Anton and Theresa Henle, who operated the Henle House, a stopover for travelers. Anton was away from home when the Dakota came. They killed 4-year-old Maria and 8-year-old Anton, and mortally wounded 12-year-old Martin. Maria and Anton died on August 18, while Martin died on September 2, 1862, in St. Paul. And even though his name is on the gravestone shown here in New Ulm's Catholic Cemetery, Martin is actually buried at an unknown location in St. Paul's Calvary Cemetery. After the uprising was put down, a Dakota named Mazabobdu, or Blows on Iron, was convicted of killing two of the Henle children. He was hanged at Mankato, Minnesota, on December 26, 1862. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Noble G. Root

Inscription:  "N. G. Root, 1819 - 1864." Noble and Eliza Root and their family lived in Shelby Township, Blue Earth County, MN in 1864. Even though the Uprising was put down in 1862, small Dakota raiding parties struck at settlers in Minnesota in 1863, 1864, and 1865. On August 11, 1864, a raiding party came through Shelby Township, mortally wounding Noble who was stacking oats with two of his sons. One son, 13-year-odd Edgar, was wounded, while the other son, 11-year-old Isaac, managed to escape unharmed. After the Dakota left, Edgar returned to his father's side, and remained with his mortally wounded father until he died. Noble's gravestone has his and other family names on it and is in the Vernon Center Cemetery in Blue Earth County. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.



Wilmot Maybee

Inscription: "Willmot, Son of C. & H. Maybee, Died Aug. 26, 1862, 27 y's & 13 d's." Wilmot Maybee was one of four men killed by the Dakota Indians in Manannah Township in northwestern Meeker County, MN on August 26, 1862. Maybee and his neighbors had fled their homes when they heard of the Uprising, but a group of them returned on August 26, 1862, to retrieve some of their possessions. They were attacked by a small Dakota party, and four white settlers were killed. Maybee attempted to flee the Dakota, but was shot and killed. His remains were found three months later. The other three victims were Phillip Deck, Linus Howe, and Joseph Page. All four are buried in Manannah Cemetery, near where they died. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Stewart B. Garvie

Inscription: "S. B. Garvie, Killed by the Indians at Yellow Medicine, Aug. 22, 1862, E 33 Yrs." In 1862, Stewart B. Garvie was working as a trader to the Dakota Indians at the Upper Sioux Agency. Late in the evening of August 18, the uprising reached the Upper Sioux Agency (also known as the Yellow Medicine Agency), with the Dakota attacking the trading posts. Garvie defended his post for most of the night, but he was wounded by buckshot in the lower abdomen. He did manage to escape, making it to the warehouse at the Agency, where other whites and some friendly Dakota had gathered. Early the next morning, the party of 62 left the warehouse, led by John Other Day, a friendly Dakota. They headed northeast, and the night of August 21, Garvie's condition had deteriorated so they had to leave him at the house of a Mr. Peck, where he died the next morning. His body was brought into Hutchinson where he was buried at the Oakland Cemetery about noon on August 23. After the Uprising was put down, many Dakota were tried by a Military Commission. Haypinkpa, or Tip of the Horn, was tried and convicted of killing Garvie. He and 37 other Dakota were hanged at Mankato, MN, on December 26, 1862. Photo submitted by Curtis Dahlin.

Louisa Frohrip Bott

Louisa Frohrip Bott, Redwood Falls MN Nov 2010 006

Louisa was the daughter of Johan and Maria Frohiep and immigrated to America in 1855. She was working at the Lower Sioux Agency at the time of the outbreak and escaped to Fort Ridgely. She married Valentin Bott in 1864 and they raised their family in Redwood Falls, MN. For more on the Bahlke/Frohrip story, see the Descendant Stories Tab. Also see the Family Photographs tab for pictures of Louisa and her family. Louisa is buried in the Lamberton City Cemetery outside of Lamberton, MN, with her husband Valentin and two of her sons. Photo submitted by Kathy Brown.

John C. Frohrip

John C Frohrip(Sr)

John was the son and Maria Bahlke and Johan Frohriep. He emigrated to America from Germany in 1855 with his mother and Uncle Andrew Bahlke. They settled in Renville County on a hill in the SE quarter of Section 25, Beaver Falls Township. He was not home with his parents on the day of the uprising, but arrived later to find his uncle killed and his mother gravely wounded lying in the yard. He loaded his mother into the wagon and headed for safety at Fort Ridgely. John later filed a Depredation Claim with Governor Ramsey; that letter is found under the Tab, Depredation Claims. That claim was denied but later he received $600.00 after filing a formal claim. John married Mary Sundermann in 1866 in LeSeuer County, and they raised their family and farmed in the area near Fort Ridgely. He died in 1881 and is buried next to his wife in the Fort Ridgely Cemetery. Photo submitted by Kathy Brown.

Maria Bahlke Frohrip

Maria married Johan Frohrip in Germany and they were the parents of five daughters, Maria, Dorothea, Wilhelmina, Frederica, and Louisa and one son, Johan. Her husband Johan died before 1854 and widowed Maria immigrated to America with her brother, Andrew Bahlke, and some of her children. They homesteaded in Beaver Falls Township on a high bluff, midway between Beaver and Birch Coulee Creeks. On the day of the uprising, the Dakota killed Andrew and gravely injured Maria. When son John found her lying in the yard, he loaded her into the wagon, escaping to Fort Ridgely. Maria Frohriep/Frohrip went to live with daughter Mary (Maria) Dresselhaus near Decorah, IA. She died there in 1887 and is buried in the Locust Lane Salem Cemetery outside of Decorah. Photo submitted by Kathy Brown.

George and Salomé Coffman Buery

Mrs. George (Salome Coffman) head stone2J. George Buery head stone - back sideJ. George BUERY Grave Marker

The Buerys and their six children settled on Section 30 of Birch Coulee Township in 1859. George was born in France in 1826 and immigrated to America at the age of 20. On the day of the outbreak, the family was warned that the Dakota were killing whites and fled to Fort Ridgely. They did not return to their homestead until 1865. Here is his obituary: “The funeral services of Mr. Geo. Buery, held at the Christian church last Sunday afternoon, were well attended. Rev. Joseelyn preached a very pathetic sermon from the text 'O death where is thy sting, Oh grave where is thy victory?' Lying on the pulpit before him was the old family bible, worn by many years' of service, and which with a few loaves of bread were the only things the family carried with them the time of the Indian massacre when they fled for the safety of their lives.” George and Salomé are buried in the Morton City Cemetery in Renville County. Photos and obituary submitted by Glenn Vogtman.


John and Maria Kumro

John and Maria Coffman Kumro and their large family lived in the Birch Coulee area of Renville County at the time of the uprising. They were warned of the killings by young Benedict Juni and escaped to Fort Ridgely with their neighbors, the George Buery family. John served in the military in Germany before immigrating to Minnesota and located to Section 32 in Birch Coulee township in 1859.  John, Maria, and son William are buried in the City Cemetery, Morton, MN. See their obituaries on the Descendants’ Stories tab. Photos submitted by Jan Klein.

William Kumro




Genevieve and Theolon Luce

Genevieve was the daughter of Pierre and Elizabeth Perreault and was twelve years old at the time of the uprising in 1862.  Her father was killed and her mother and siblings, Melvina, Joseph, George and Mary Philomene, escaped. Genevieve married Theolon Luce and they raised their family of 13 children near Shakopee, MN. They are buried in the Calvary Cemetery, St. Paul, MN. For more on the Perreault family, see the Family Stories section of this website. Her photograph is found on the Family Photographs section. Photographs submitted by Jan Klein.

Tore Olson and Uriah Loomis

Tore Olson was part of the Leavenworth Rescue Expedition that left New Ulm on August 19 because they were concerned about the settlers who remained in their homes west of New Ulm. The party had split up and those in the party that went down the north side of the Cottonwood River were ambushed by the Dakota when they returned to New Ulm. All but one of the party died. Uriah Loomis was one of those that died. The inscription on his gravestone reads "Uriah Loomis, Killed by Indians, Aug. 19, 1862, Aged 17 Years." It is likely that another victim, Tore Olson, is probably buried in the same coffin with Uriah. The August 29, 1862 issue of the "St. Paul Daily Press" quotes from a diary kept by O. M. Crary, who was at New Ulm at the time. His diary entry for August 20 reads "Mr. Lumis --- died from wounds; buried in the same coffin with Orlsten." Almond's nearby gravestone contains both his name and that of William Tuttle, so they are also very likely in the same coffin, and not just the same grave. A historic marker near the Loretto Hospital marks the location where the attacks occurred. Their tombstone is in the New Ulm City Cemetery. To read more about Uriah Loomis, see his findagrave memorial posted by Curtis Dahlin at: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=loomis&GSfn=uriah&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=34635255&df=all&

Almena Hurd Woodward

Almena (or Alomina as she was once called) is a survivor of the Lake Shetek massacre who escaped with her two children. She led them on a perilous journey until they were finally rescued by soldiers. Her husband Phineas had gone missing after a trip to the Dakota Territory earlier, and when the Dakota attacked, she recognized his horse and knew he was probably killed. For more details on her story, Bill Cox has created a memorial which includes her obituary on findagrave.com at this url: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=woodward&GSfn=almena&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=63748588&df=all&Almena is buried in the John Lyman Cemetery, Roulette, Potter County, PA where she lived with her second husband, Elbridge Woodward. Photos courtesy of Bill Cox. 

Ottilie Boelter, Daughter of John and Justina Boelter 

Ottilie was three years old at the time of the Dakota War. She survived because of her mother’s courage and stamina. For more on her story, see the Findagrave memorial done by Bill Cox at:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=60211464. Ottilie is buried in the Evangelical Cemetery in Nerstrand, Rice, MN. Here is the inscription of her tombstone:  Inscription: “Daughter of John and Justina Boelter. Stepdaughter of Michael Boelter. Accidental gunshot wound reported March 31, 1880.” Photo courtesy of Bill Cox. 





Julius Boelter, Son of John and Justina Boelter 

Julius was just one year-old at the time of the Dakota War. He was saved by his Uncle Michael Boelter who carried him to safety to Fort Ridgely. Michael eventually became his stepfather as his father John was a victim of the war, and his mother remarried her brother-in-law. For more on his story, see the Findagrave memorial done by Bill Cox at: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=68528396. Julius is buried in the Evangelical Cemetery in Nerstrand, Rice, MN.  Photo courtesy of Bill Cox. 

John Kochendorfer, Son of Johan and Catherine

John Kochendorfer-filtered

John  was 11 years old when the outbreak began. His father, mother and sister were killed on August 18, and John and his three siblings escaped to the safety of Fort Ridgely. For more on his story, see the Findagrave memorial created by Bill Cox at:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=82216181. John is buried in the Oakland Cemetery, St. Paul, MN. Photo courtesy of Bill Cox. 

Margaret "Maggie" Kochendorfer Erchinger, Daughter of Johan and Catherine Kochendorfer

Margaret Erchinger

Maggie was about 5 years-old when the Dakota War broke out. She and her siblings escaped to Fort Ridgely after her parents and sister were killed at their home in Flora Township, Renville County. Her full story is found on the Findagrave memorial created by Bill Cox at this site: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84533410, Photo courtesy of Chad Eugene Schneider.

Catherina Kochendorfer Staph, Daughter of Johan and Catherine Kochendorfer

Catherine Staph

Catherina was a survivor of the Dakota War by escaping with her 3 siblings to Fort Ridgely with the help of some neighbors.  Herparents and 3-year old sister Sarah were killed on August 18, on  the family farm in the Middle Creek settlement in Flora Township, Renville, MN.  She was 7 years old at the time.  Catherina was born April 15, 1855 in Cazenovia, Woodford, IL and died Nov. 28, 1896 in South Branch, Watonwan, MN. She married  Jacob Staph on March 7, 1871 and they were the parents of four children.  Catherina is buried in Emmanuel Cemetery, Castle Rock, Dakota, MN. Photo courtesy of David Long. 

Rosena Kochendorfer Keller

This is the tombstone of Rosena Kochendorfer Keller, daughter of John and Catherine Kochendorfer who were killed at their home on Section 33 of Flora Township.  She and her siblings escaped to the Fort Ridgely, and the children then made their home with various family friends. Rosena married Theodore Keller in 1869. They were the parents of Elsie and Sarah. All are buried in the Trimbelle Cemetery, Pierce County, WI.  Sarah’s tombstone is on the left, behind the Keller stone. She was the daughter of Theodore’s first wife who died during childbirth. Photo courtesy of Bill Cox.

Charles Lammers, Son of William and Sophia Lammers

Charles Lammers1

Charles, his brother Frederick, and mother, Sophia were captured by the Dakota in Cairo Township in Renville County. His father William was killed that same day. After they were set free at Camp Release, his mother married George Rieke. Charles married Emma Durbahn and they were the parents of 6 children. They are buried in the Fort Ridgely Cemetery, Nicollet, MN.  Photo submitted by Glenn Kieker. 


Ahrens, Beaver Falls Cemetery

Henry and Minnie Ahrens

 Henry and his wife Minnie (Carolina Wilhelmina Sophia Bobzin) homesteaded in Beaver Falls Township. They escaped the conflict by fleeing to Illinois and were among the first to return to their home. They were the parents of nine children. Henry and Minnie are buried in the Beaver Falls Cemetery along with children, Minnie, Willie and Lena. Their story can be found in our book, What Happened to the Settlers in Renville County in the Beaver Falls chapter. Photo by Jan Klein. 

 


Family and Friends of Dakota Uprising Victims: http://www.dakotavictims1862.com